Marsh v. Alabama, 326 U.S. 501 (1946)

Marsh v. Alabama is a remarkable decision in which a Jehova’s witness attempted to distribute literature in a township operated by a private company. She was arrested and charged with trespass. The Supreme Court reasoned that even though the township existed within the property rights of a private company, “[o]wnership does not always mean absolute dominion. The more an owner, for his advantage, opens up his property for use by the public in general, the more do his rights become circumscribed by the statutory and constitutional rights of those who use it.” The U.S. Supreme Court reversed Alabama on First Amendment grounds and vacated Marsh’s state conviction. Supreme Court opinions from the era are notably concise and this one is definitely worth the read.  Marsh v. Alabama

Counterintuitive Business Principles

Ever heard of Goodhart’s Law (measurement), Parkinson’s Law (efficiency), or Peter’s Principle (competency)? Here, NPR’s Planet Money podcast explains their business and social evolution.Continue Reading